Invasive Grass Takes Over

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Invasive Grass Takes Over

Pulling Phragmites in Georgian Bay… on this CurrentCast.

Wetlands in Ontario’s Georgian Bay are threatened by an invasive grass called Phragmites that outcompetes many native species.

Phragmites

Sweetnam: “It actually can grow to about 18 feet tall and displace native plants from their aquatic habitat.”

That’s David Sweetnam of the nonprofit Georgian Bay Forever. He says in some areas, there are hundreds of Phragmites plants per square meter.

Sweetnam: “You have species that go between the water and the land like turtles, to lay their eggs. They can’t physically get through the stands of Phragmites.”

So Sweetnam’s group is training volunteers to identify and remove the invasive plants by hand. Learn more.
CurrentCast is produced in partnership with Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future. Learn more online at CurrentCast.org.

Listen to the podcast.

Inspiring Stories of Local Champions and Community Phragbusting
  • Sturgeon Bay link
  • Blue Water link
  • Tay link
  • Honey Harbour link
  • Woods Bay link
  • Collingwood link
  • And SO many More

    What you can do

  • Invasive Phragmites are taking over shorelines. Join a local Phragbuster group in your area of Georgian Bay, or reach out to us to start one.
  • Learn about preventing invasive species during Invasive Species Awareness Week. Info and resources
  • Please donate to Georgian Bay Forever! Every donation is so important to us to continue projects and education efforts that help protect the water of Georgian Bay.