Baby Beluga in the Deep Blue…River?

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds.
Baby beluga in the deep blue… river? On this CurrentCast.

It sounds like a whale of a tale, but it’s not. Thirteen species of cetaceans can be found in the St. Lawrence River.

Robert Michaud of the Group for Research and Education on Marine Mammals says some, such as sperm and blue whales, live in the ocean and swim up into the river. Others, like belugas, stay there year-round.

Michaud: “So the St. Lawrence is an amazing area. The biodiversity out there is amazing.”

But this biodiversity may be at risk. Michaud says the river’s beluga population is declining – raising concerns about new contaminants in the river. So he says long-term tracking of the whales and water quality is needed to better understand the problem and identify solutions.

CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast is produced in partnership with Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial ideas. CurrentCast is produced in partnership with Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. Learn more online at CurrentCast.org.

Listen to the podcast.

Biodiversity in Georgian Bay

Georgian Bay Forever is working with Dr. Kevin McCann of the University of Guelph, and the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding to catalogue all the aquatic organisms in Georgian Bay. This will help with measuring the impact of environmental stressors like climate change and human activity such as shoreline development as well as aiding in future conservation efforts, ecosystem monitoring, forensics, and tracking invasives. All the specimens collected and identified will also contribute to the International Barcode of Life, a multi-nation effort to catalogue the world's biodiversity.

Learn more about the Georgian Bay project.