Sander vitreus – common name is “Walleye”

Georgian Bay Forever is working with Dr. Kevin McCann of the University of Guelph, and the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding to catalogue all the aquatic organisms in Georgian Bay. This will help with measuring the impact of environmental stressors like climate change and human activity such as shoreline development as well as aiding in future conservation efforts, ecosystem monitoring, forensics, and tracking invasives. All the specimens collected and identified will also contribute to the International Barcode of Life , a multi-nation effort to catalogue the world's biodiversity. Here is one example from Georgian Bay's Aquatic Species Library.

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Wetlands, Extreme Rain, and Climate Change

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative.

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La Niña is no longer in the fall winter forecast

This summer, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) 12 month outlook included the probability, but not certainty of La Nina developing in the Fall. We discussed that in our latest newsletter that recently went out. However, in USACE’s new October outlook which came out after the newsletter went to print, “The El Niño Southern Oscillation index is no longer forecasted to develop into a LA Niña for the fall and winter.”

Regional weather prediction has no certainty with so many factors affecting it. For water levels, NOAA’s computer simulation predictions depends on many different inputs, the most important being overlake precipitation, overlake evaporation, and rainfall induced runoff. In it’s Oct 12 month outlook, NOAA is saying “[El Niño Southern Oscillatio] or ENSO-neutral conditions exist and the forecast is favoring that ENSO-neutral conditions will persist through the winter.”

See what the October 2016, 12 month outlook reports:

12MonthSimulation/WLOutlookSummary


Amnicola limosa – a genus of freshwater snail

Georgian Bay Forever is working with Dr. Kevin McCann of the University of Guelph, and the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding to catalogue all the aquatic organisms in Georgian Bay. This will help with measuring the impact of environmental stressors like climate change and human activity such as shoreline development as well as aiding in future conservation efforts, ecosystem monitoring, forensics, and tracking invasives. All the specimens collected and identified will also contribute to the International Barcode of Life , a multi-nation effort to catalogue the world's biodiversity. Here is one example from Georgian Bay's Aquatic Species Library.

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Invasive Round Gobies

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative.

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Multiplying Mussels

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative.
Invasive mussels muscle their way into the Great Lakes…on this CurrentCast.

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What’s up with Muck?

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative.
What’s mucking up Great Lakes’ beaches… on this CurrentCast.

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Tay takes on invasive Phragmites

Georgian Bay Forever (GBF) is proud to support the invasive Phragmites fighting efforts of Tay Township and the wonderful Tay volunteers. The community effort was initiated by Councillor Catherine Root and managed by Bryan Anderson, Manager of Parks, Recreation & Facilities. GBF provided a letter of support to the Township for their successful application to the Land Stewardship and Habitat Restoration Program Grant application (Government of Ontario). The grant helped the Tay Township remove invasive Phragmites from 6 of the local Park/Waterfront areas. GBF helped by training staff and volunteers in the selective cut method.

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Stream bubbles and climate change

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative.
Freshwater streams could contribute to climate change… on this CurrentCast.

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A story from the frontline of the war on Phragmites

GBF is supporting the Honey Harbour Association's Ambassador Program by training 2 students to educate and help community members to identify and remove invasive Phragmites in Honey Harbour using the selective cut method. Leading the effort for Honey Harbour is Kathryn Davis, longtime local Phragmites leader and Honey Harbour Association Director. She and GBF are passionate about removing invasive Phragmites, a reed originally from Europe, which has no natural controls and quickly grows into very dense and tall monocultures which threaten biodiversity, wetland functioning, and recreational access to the beautiful coastal shorelines we all enjoy. To read more about invasive Phragmites, please click this link.

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