Hockey weekends and the Nottawasaga River

Like many of you, I spend a fair amount of time in hockey rinks with other parents watching our little ones experience the ecstasy and agony of one of the best sports in the world. Last weekend, I was at a hockey tournament in the Nottawasaga area. Sadly, our team didn’t fare too well on the ice, but did happily enjoy being together and having fun. It did give me the opportunity to see the Nottawasaga River, and an excuse to link two great passions – hockey and learning about water that feeds Georgian Bay.

Climate Change Part 2 – NASA determines wetlands impact from space

Half the worlds wetlands have been lost since 1900 ( UN) , mostly due to human disturbance. What is not known is the impact of lowering water levels due to climate change. While water levels in Georgian Bay fluctuate for a variety of reasons, the long-term trend (30 to 40 years) is that Lake Huron-Michigan water level averages will continue to decline largely in response to climate change, with probabilities of extreme lows and possibilities of short-term highs.Lowered water levels can strand and destroy areas of wetland. GBF wanted to know the impact to the relatively pristine wetlands of Georgian Bay that play such a critical role in its health.In 2014 and 2015, Georgian Bay Forever and the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Cities Initiative participated in collaborative work with the NASA-DEVELOP program and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment to map wetland change in the Georgian Bay area. Read More

A view from the Paris climate talks

Written by Jonathan Scott. Jonathan Scott is a law student and writer living in the United Kingdom. It’s Friday evening, midway through the COP21 Climate Change Conference, and there’s an event for the young activists assembled to pressure their governments into action. It’s a spoken word night in an extraordinary location.The old Gare Ornano in the 18th arrondissement opened in 1869, closed in 1934 and has been the site of La Recyclerie, an urban farm and vegan café, since 2014. Picture lots of exposed beams and a loft overlooking the main,…

Water quality at risk with climate change – Part 1

Climate change is all around us and certainly in the news with the Climate Change talks in Paris. Climate change is arguably the biggest and most challenging threat to the Great lakes.Most of the last century’s warmest years in the region all occurred in the last decade. (Read here to understand weather like El Nino vs. climate) The long term climate trend is showing that the region, like the world is heating up more rapidly then anytime in history despite recent short-term cold winter variations. [headline…

Confused by the El Niño weather effect on lake levels for Huron Michigan?

Post updated January 19, 2016 and noted inside El Niño is a weather pattern created from the interaction of the atmosphere and the ocean producing warmer than normal water temperatures in the Pacific Ocean. Even though it occurs at the equator, it produces weather conditions globally – including in the Great Lakes Region. Water levels are impacted by many variables including short term weather like El Niño and longer term climate conditions. It is important to understand both.NOAA describes it…

Getting closer to predicting algal blooms in 5 questions

In October 2015, GBF’s David Sweetnam met University of Toronto Associate Professor Maria Dittrich in Honey Harbour to help her research measuring the make-up of the sediment, and its capacity to release Phosphorous into the water. It’s important research as freshwater with high Phosphorous is linked with an increased risk in toxic algal blooms. We asked Professor Dittrich some questions about her research, and have included extra information marked GBF to explain some of the details.How does your research support protecting and enhancing the waters of Georgian…