Septic Systems and Potable Water Vulnerabilities, Insurance & Planning, Coastal Infrastructure

Water Levels Series In Fall 2021, Georgian Bay Forever (GBF) and the Georgian Bay Association(GBA) hosted a webinar series: Extreme Water Levels: Impacts and Strategies. This series was a collection of webinars aimed at answering questions, providing strategies to adapt your property and your budget, and raising awareness about the extremes and variabilities that will impact the ecosystem and your family's enjoyment of your favourite place on the Bay.

There were 3 webinars. This page addresses the third webinar.

To see page summaries of the past 2 webinars - look to these links:
Water Levels: What's Happening? What's New? (Oct. 23, 2021) can be found here.
Shorelines, Docks and Shoreline Structures (Nov.13, 2021) can be found here.
Septics and Water Levels
Speakers included:

Dr. Neil Hutchinson: Hutchinson Environmental Services
Cheryl Evans: Director, Flood and Wildfire Resilience, Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation at the University of Waterloo Nicola Crawhall: Nicola’s consulting firm, Westbrook Public Affairs, led the secretariat that developed Action Plan 2030.
David Sweetnam: Executive Director of Georgian Bay Forever
Rupert Kindersley:Executive Director of the Georgian Bay Association

With Remarks by:

Elder Marilyn Capreol, Anishinaabe from Shawanaga First Nation - Founding member of the Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership Elder’s Lodge
Rolfe Jones: Executive Director and President of the Georgian Bay Association, and Adam Chamberlain, Chair of Georgian Bay Forever.
Aisha Chiandet: Water Scientist with the Severn Sound Environmental Association
There were 3 webinars. This page addresses the third webinar.

To see page summaries of the past 2 webinars - look to these links:
Water Levels: What's Happening? What's New? (Oct. 23, 2021) can be found here.
Shorelines, Docks and Shoreline Structures (Nov.13, 2021) can be found here.

COMPLETED/INFO HERE – Webinar 3: Septic Systems and Potable Water Vulnerabilities, Insurance & Planning, Coastal Infrastructure

Sat. Dec. 4, from 10 am to 12 pm.

Topics included:
    TOPIC A: Septic Systems & Potable Water. How vulnerable is your septic system? What are the options to resolve septic issues? How will potable water be affected by extreme water levels? What techniques/technologies are available to address these impacts?
    TOPIC B: Insurance. Flooding – extreme storm events – damage from wind and waves? What are the potential impacts on property insurance? What risks can be insured?
    TOPIC C: Planning and Infrastructure. Action Plan 2030 – review of key recommendations concerning support for individuals, businesses and municipal governments to address shoreline infrastructure impacts and shoreline resilience. What are the benefits of long-term planning vs executing short term solutions?

Slides can be found here.
Video. Watch the 2 hour webinar here.

Top 7 Major Takeaways from the December 4th Webinar: Shorelines, Docks & Shoreline Structure of the Extreme Water Levels series:

Download the detailed synoposis here (15 page PDF).

1) Septic-system design and construction will need to be adapted to the rising water levels that we can already anticipate, which includes siting tile fields on high ground (and can mean moving away from gravity-fed septic systems).

2) The many water-related consequences of climate change mean that we need to: 1) avoid consuming untreated surface water; 2) plan for an increased need for water treatment (filtration and chlorination); and 3) plan for the costs of upgrades to water-treatment systems.

3) A step-by-step approach to addressing the most common water damage-related risks includes a focus in the shorter term on completing simple, low-cost maintenance and upgrade actions, and in the longer term completing more complex upgrades after evaluating options with qualified professionals, government and insurance representatives. Select a particular approach to protecting your cottage based on: a) unique flood and erosion risks; 2) severity of risk; 3) budget; and 4) insurance coverages.

4) The mindset we bring to addressing ‘flood and erosion’ is shifting towards:’ 1) management with nature in mind (i.e., using nature-based – rather than ‘hardening’ – solutions); and 2) management with community-level (rather than lot-by-lot) approaches and future conditions in mind.

5) Discuss your coverages and options with your insurance representative, ask questions about premium discounts and about building back better after a loss, and check back with your insurer periodically given the rapidly changing state of insurance for home floods, overland floods and storm surges and the limited availability of government recovery assistance after large-scale disasters.

6) Four Action Plan 2030 recommendations address support for individuals, businesses and municipal governments to address shoreline infrastructure impacts and shoreline resilience: #4) establishing and funding shoreline resiliency priority zones; #8) increasing investment in light detection and ranging (LIDAR), floodplain mapping, and monitoring/modelling data; #10) ensuring access to easily understood climate change data and information; and #12) supporting natural and green infrastructure solutions.

7) There are many benefits of long-term planning over short-term solutions, and examples of long-term planning as it pertains to crib/concrete docks, shoreline and low-elevation structures, and septic systems.
There were 3 webinars. This page addresses the third webinar.

To see page summaries of the past 2 webinars - look to these links:
Water Levels: What's Happening? What's New? (Oct. 23, 2021) can be found here.
Shorelines, Docks and Shoreline Structures (Nov.13, 2021) can be found here.