2019 Georgian Bay Cuts for Invasive Phragmites

2019 Georgian Bay Phragbusting Cuts. Join one of these communities (scroll for yours).   Don’t see your community? Email Brooke to create a community cut with your neighbours!Tay: Please register to volunteer and get more details from Brooke.SATURDAY AUGUST 17th- Sturgeon Bay along Robin’s Point Road, Waubaushene (Rain date- August 24th)Honey Harbour: If you are in the Honey Harbour area, please register to volunteer and get more details from Brooke.SATURDAY JULY 20th (Location: TBD) SATURDAY AUGUST 10th (Location: TBD) SATURDAY AUGUST 24th (Location: TBD)Cognashene:   12 Mile Bay:SATURDAY JULY 27th (Location TBD)Pointe au Baril: For details and to register, Marine Patrol  Your Georgian…

2017 Georgian Bay Cuts for Invasive Phragmites

July 2017. With more than 8,000 km of shoreline, Georgian Bay is home to some of the Canada's most pristine coastal wetlands. Many creatures and organisms depend on these wetlands for life-sustaining activities like food and foraging, nurseries, spawning, shade, water treatment and shelter. This tenacious invasive plant, Phragmites australis subsp australis, grows quickly and densely into monocultures that threaten to reduce plant biodiversity, decrease habitat for endangered species, and damage the proper functioning of Georgian Bay's coastal wetlands. You can help fight this invasive! Volunteer for one of the cuts listed below. Read More

A story from the frontline of the war on Phragmites

GBF is supporting the Honey Harbour Association's Ambassador Program by training 2 students to educate and help community members to identify and remove invasive Phragmites in Honey Harbour using the selective cut method. Leading the effort for Honey Harbour is Kathryn Davis, longtime local Phragmites leader and Honey Harbour Association Director. She and GBF are passionate about removing invasive Phragmites, a reed originally from Europe, which has no natural controls and quickly grows into very dense and tall monocultures which threaten biodiversity, wetland functioning, and recreational access to the beautiful coastal shorelines we all enjoy. To read more about invasive Phragmites, please click this link. Read More

Georgian Bay Communities Fight Invasive Phragmites. Now!

July 2016. With more than 8,000 km of shoreline, Georgian Bay is home to some of the Canada's most pristine coastal wetlands. Many creatures and organisms depend on these wetlands for life-sustaining activities like food and foraging, nurseries, spawning, shade, water treatment and shelter. This tenacious invasive plant, Phragmites australis subsp australis, grows quickly and densely into moncultures that threaten to reduce plant biodiversity, decrease habitat for endangered species, and damage the proper functioning of Georgian Bay's coastal wetlands. Read More