Wetlands, Extreme Rain, and Climate Change

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative. Read More

Wetland Wonderlands

GBF is partnering with CurrentCast to share information that they develop with other partners about water stewardship and sustainability in the Great Lakes and surrounding watersheds. CurrentCast is a project of the Center for Transformative Action based at Cornell University. CurrentCast content is owned by ChavoBart Digital Media, Inc. The Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University provides scientific content support and reviews all editorial idea for the initiative.Swamps, marshes, and other wetland wonderlands… on this CurrentCast. Read More

On World Wetlands Day, treasure Georgian Bay’s wetlands

Most wetlands in the Great Lakes have already been lost or degraded due to human disturbance. More than 50% of wetlands in Lakes Michigan, Erie and Ontario have been negatively affected. But in Lakes Superior and Huron, including Georgian Bay, over 70% have been minimally impacted.With more than 8,000 km of shoreline on The Bay and 3,700 aquatic marshes in Eastern and Northern Georgian Bay alone, these areas provide high quality habitat for fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, birds, waterfowl, a variety of other land-based wildlife, as well as numerous in-water and coastal plant species. Read More

Hockey weekends and the Nottawasaga River

Like many of you, I spend a fair amount of time in hockey rinks with other parents watching our little ones experience the ecstasy and agony of one of the best sports in the world. Last weekend, I was at a hockey tournament in the Nottawasaga area. Sadly, our team didn’t fare too well on the ice, but did happily enjoy being together and having fun. It did give me the opportunity to see the Nottawasaga River, and an excuse to link two great passions – hockey and learning about water that feeds Georgian Bay.

Climate Change Part 2 – NASA determines wetlands impact from space

Half the worlds wetlands have been lost since 1900 ( UN) , mostly due to human disturbance. What is not known is the impact of lowering water levels due to climate change. While water levels in Georgian Bay fluctuate for a variety of reasons, the long-term trend (30 to 40 years) is that Lake Huron-Michigan water level averages will continue to decline largely in response to climate change, with probabilities of extreme lows and possibilities of short-term highs.Lowered water levels can strand and destroy areas of wetland. GBF wanted to know the impact to the relatively pristine wetlands of Georgian Bay that play such a critical role in its health.In 2014 and 2015, Georgian Bay Forever and the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Cities Initiative participated in collaborative work with the NASA-DEVELOP program and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment to map wetland change in the Georgian Bay area. Read More